KOT DIGI FORT

The Kot Diji Fort, formally known as Fort Ahmadabad, is a 19th century Talpur-era fort located in the town of Kot Diji in Khairpur District, Pakistan about 25 miles east of the Indus River at the edge of the Thar Desert. The fort sits above a pre-Harappan Civilization archaeological site dating to 2500 to 2800 B.C.E.

GATE TO PRISON

A small prison inside the fort held prisoners, convicted in a courtroom which was hosted inside the fort.

EAGLE NEST

The Kot Digi fort sits atop a 110 foot tall high hill that rises above the city of Kot Diji. The fort’s 30 foot tall walls encircle the uppermost portion of the fort, resulting a narrow-width fortress with perimeter of 1.8 kilometres. The fort contains three strategically placed towers that are each 50 feet tall. The fort contains several sites for cannon placement, and contains numerous inner passages for protection.

THE GREAT WALL OF SINDH

Ranikot Fort is a historical Talpur fort near Sann, Jamshoro District, Sindh, Pakistan. Ranikot Fort is also known as The Great Wall of Sindh and is believed to be the world’s largest fort with a circumference of approximately 32 kilometres (20 mi). The fort’s ramparts have been compared to the Great Wall of China. Archaeologists point to the 17th century as the time of its first construction but Sindh archaeologists now agree that some of the present structures were reconstructed by Talpurs in 1812.

MAKLI NECROPOLIS

The Sufi saint, poet and scholar Shaikh Jamali established a khanqah, or Sufi gathering site, at Makli and was eventually buried there. The 14th century Trakhan ruler, Jam Tamachi, venerated the saint and wished to be interred near the saint, beginning the tradition of using Makli as a funerary site. The site rose to prominence as a major funerary site during under the rule of the Samma dynasty, who had made their capital near Thatta. The most architecturally significant tombs at the site date from around the time of the Mughal era, between 1570 and 1640 CE.

SUKKUR BARRAGE

The Barrage was built during the British Raj from 1923 to 1932 and was named Lloyd Barrage. The Sukkur Barrage, is the pride of Pakistan’s Irrigation system as it is the largest single Irrigation network of its kind in the world. It irrigates from Sukkur District in the North, to Mirpurkhas/ Tharparkar and Hyderabad districts in the South of Sindh, almost all parts of the Province except few.